Alpaca Atlantic of Tennessee
 Sales

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Alpacas for Sale

    Bill and I raise alpacas, but we don't raise them with the expectation of selling them. We have never marketed our alpacas with a, "Must make room, Have too many, or Need space for the new crias," prefix. If we breed a female, it's with the expectation that we'll keep the cria. We'll never win an award for marketing - but that's OK with us!

    If you want to see what we have to offer, please start with a visit. We won't meet you at the gate with a sales sheet, and if you decide you're interested, you'll have to bring up the subject first. When it comes to selling alpacas, we're about as low-pressure as you'll find, without moving in reverse -- probably because we honestly wouldn't mind if we never made another sale!

Our prices are reasonable, our animals healthy and sound, and our commitment to helping you get started is based on over a dozen years of experience!

Want additional information?
Just phone me (Lisa) at 931-728-6945,   or   send an E-Mail!

Proven Females

Yup -- I've got proven females! To fall under this category, the female has to have NEVER had reproductive issues.

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Maidens: Both Bred & Open

We've got some maidens also!

Little Soapbox: We don't breed our girls until they are at least 2 years of age, and only then if their hymens have broken down on their own. In our experience, girls have less reproductive issues if they aren't bred before they are physically mature.

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Companion Females

Little Soapbox: Every breeder should consider having at least one companion animal. If you have to take a girl to the vets, have to take a girl off for breeding, or have to confine a girl for some reason -- you don't want to have to use one of your investments as a companion.

We generally offer one companion girl per group - but work hard to try to meet the needs of our customers.
(A group is 2 or more breeding females.)

And yes, we've got companion females!

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Fiber Boys

      A quick note about boy toys: We believe only the best of the best should be used for breeding. Since it's hard to assess an alpaca's conformation, fiber, and attitude before they've matured, we put our money where our mouth is -- and sell all juvenile males that we think actually have potential, as potential geldings!

      No matter how good a young boy looks, we don't think you should have to pay a herdsire price unless he also looks good as a matured male. So, if we think a boy has potential, we'll charge a non-breeding price (for this you get the boy), with an upgrade option (for this you get his registration papers). You alone will determine if the boy meets your breeding standards when he has matured. We don't make as much of a profit this way, but we've been selling boys this way for years, and it's a win-win for all involved!

      In our humble opinion, if a farm doesn't sell more fiber-boys than possible-breeders, it means they aren't willing to, or aren't able to assess the quality of their alpacas. Just because a male is capable of producing sperm, doesn't mean he should be sold as a potential herdsires!

And yes, we've got a variety of boy toys!
 

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BVD Status

    Hmmmmm. What does BVD have to do with Sales??? Absolutely everything. You'll never have a thriving sales program if you've got a thriving BVD virus on your place. And you'll never know if you have BVD, unless you test!

    I'm thrilled to announce that as of February 8th, 2006, every animal on our farm (visitors included) had been tested, and found to be free of BVD. Whoopeeee!!!!! Poor Evie came back with a "Toxic" result - but that's what you get if you suck blood into the syringe from a dribble along-side the rectum. Evie has since had two re-tests (VI and SN), drawing blood from the vein this time - both were negative. So much for saving her from a second poke!

    Since our mass-testing, every new animal on the farm has gone straight to our quarantine facilities, and are treated as if they are infected - which protects our herd. After 6 weeks, they are screened and tested. They don't join our herd unless they pass with flying colors. We don't take risks when it comes to health.
    Biological warfare is right up Bill's alley (former Marine), so he's pretty much gone overboard with the protection of our herd. He had the quarantine pasture and barn, ready in time for spring birthing (2006), even though all of our pregnant girls tested clean. Like Bill says, if you have it, you won't need it.

    One of the many rewards of having a closed herd is the ability to minimize health risks. While it's impossible to guarantee the future health of any living being, we can sure stack the cards in our favor!

     
Interesting BVD Links:

  • The Alpaca Research Foundation has set itself up as the clearinghouse of information and is currently funding research in this area. Click on the "Search ARF" link on the left, type in "BVD", then check out the "Census of Confirmed Cases...." link. It's got lots of good information.
  • Some of the Diagnostic Laboratories have set up information pages such as Washington State University and Purdue University.
  • Then, once you think you have a good grasp on BVD -- scan through these articles on the Rocky Mountain Llama & Alpaca Association site, to be sure! Lots of interesting first-hand stories.
  • Or you could always just Google "BVD+alpaca" and sort through the links!
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Sales Program

    Contrary to popular belief, Bill and I do have some alpacas available for sale each year!

    If you're a first-time buyer, we don't even want you to consider buying from us unless you feel comfortable working with us -- because your first purchase should include more than animals, a contract, and a check -- it should include the support that will get you off and running. You're not just buying animals, you're buying a mentor! So investigate the animals, but also investigate the breeder!!!

    Bill and I don't know everything, and have yet to meet anyone that does! But, we've been around a while and will share what we know and what we've learned, with our customers. We don't play try to find me, or contract loophole games. We treat folks the way we would want to be treated.

    Come and visit. It's really the only way you're going to get to know us, what we stand for (and won't stand for!), the quality animals we're breeding, and what we have to offer. After that, if you feel comfortable, tell us what you're looking for and we'll tell you if we have anyone we think you'll be delighted with. Our prices are reasonable because our overhead is low: we use a stock trailer, market by word-of-mouth, and don't even pay each other minimum wage!

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Sales Philosophy

    Bill and I have different philosophies concerning the sales aspect of this business. He wants to keep them all. I don't mind selling some, as that opens space for future breeding. I saw a bumper sticker once that said, "Don't breed if you can't feed." I don't think they were referring to alpacas -- but that's always been our philosophy!

    Selling is hard, no doubt about it. Bill has already re-written his job description eliminating deliveries. Just as well. He would probably come back with a full load each trip, pretending I gave him bad directions!

    We sell a representation of our best, and stand behind our animals 100%. If we can't back them -- we won't sell them, it's that simple. When you visit, you won't need binoculars to view our herd and we don't need catch-pens or chutes to let you get close. We treat our animals with attention, care and respect-and it shows.

All of our alpacas come with:
  • Generous group incentives that can be quite creative!
  • Any female we've sold, that hasn't left our farm yet, will be bred for free, to any available male on our Herdsire listing. No kidding! And yes, we'll board your girls so that you can take advantage of this offer.
  • Health guarantees
  • Reproductive guarantees on breeding stock
  • Groups are delivered for free if within a 6-hour drive -- others may be delivered at cost
  • Full disclosure of the animal's health, reproductive history, and personality quirks
  • Last, but certainly not least, our animals are guaranteed to make you smile!
And about our contracts
  • They're written in English, not doubletalk
  • They aren't filled with loopholes -- guarantees are black and white
  • They're written to protect both us and you
  • We'll start with a proposed draft, then we'll rework it if necessary, line-by-line. It's not a contract until everyone agrees it's a contract!
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Lisa's Over-50 Opinionated Soapbox Time!

    Bill and I enjoy making a profit -- but not at the expense of our animals. Our business plan includes seeing to the welfare of our girls BEFORE we ever consider breeding them. We don't breed maidens before 2 years of age, and then, only if they show signs of physical maturity. We also give breeding girls maternal breaks whenever they need one, or whenever I want them to have one. Our breaks are intentional, and built into our business plan. They aren't excuses for not being able to get poorly conditioned girls pregnant.
Sure, we've heard all the supportive theories for non-stop breeding:
  • In South America, alpacas are bred as soon as they are physically able, and do just fine.
  • They've been bred on a yearly basis for thousands of years in South America, and have flourished.
  • Since the fetus doesn't really develop much until the last couple months, being bred while nursing last year's cria really doesn't put that much of a strain on the female.
  • If you don't breed them every year, you may have a hard time getting them pregnant.
    Well, concerning the South American breeding program: these animals are bred young because, with only a couple exceptions, all animals are grazed as a single herd. The herdsires are the ones that decide when the maidens are old enough. The mortality rate is high. Adult females are often sent to market when their fiber begins to coarsen. Dead crias are turned into pillows, rugs, or stuffed toys.

    In my humble opinion (I have many of these, if you haven't noticed!), breeding as soon as the female is capable of conception, and on a yearly basis until death, isn't what we do here!

    We take care of our animals first -- and in turn, they take care of us!       I'm off my soapbox......for now!   ;)

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Traditional Welcome Newly Arrived
& Coming
Attractions
Congratulations
to our
Customers!
Herdsires of
Alpaca Atlantic

New!
Prickless
Crimp
Alpaca
Protection
Helpful
Sites
Storm Tips New!
Lisa's
Soap-box

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