HTML form of sample article for HIJ project

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<article>
<aref>
:t1 Alice, Lets, and The HIJ Processor
:t2 #HTML, Index, and Journal for the#[Journal of Military History]
:tf 1
:a1 David Bausum
:af 2
:ab writes software.
</aref>

<page foot=3><footnote number=1 nodisplay>Unfortunately, I
cannot thank the National Science Foundation for funding this
research. However, various people on the staff of <it>The Journal
of Military History</it> have provided feedback and suggestions to
the evolving hij project, and I thank them.</footnote><footnote
number=2 nodisplay>This is not a real footnote. Its only purpose is
to show that both the title and the author (of an essay) can
<it>be</it> footnoted.</footnote> <dropcap>This essay
is not the official documentation for the hij
processor.<footnote>See ``The HIJ Processor'' by David Bausum
[1998]. It lists all commands, attributes, and items used by the
processor, and it gives background information that some readers may
find helpful. It may read <it>dry</it>, but it is intended to
document (without ambiguity) the hij process.</footnote> In fact
this essay does not even say what the hij processor is or explain why
it is! It assumes that you, the reader, know, don't care, or can
figure out answers to such big questions by yourself.<footnote>If
you are totally stumped, a good place to start is with ``The HIJ
Processor''.</footnote>

On the other hand when you are preparing a hij document, you will at
times ask ``Can the processor do <line wd=.5in ht=0.25pt>? If so,
how?'' One purpose of this document is to answer such
questions.<footnote>Another purpose is to serve as a general
purpose document I can use during the development and debugging of the
hij program.</footnote> So, let's get started.

<section numc=5></section>

<noindent>Here is a list of topics that this document examines:

<parstyle bulstyle=2 lskip=.3in tskip=2pt>Footnotes. Tons and tons
of footnotes.</parstyle>

<parstyle bulstyle=1 lskip=.3in tskip=2pt>Fonts. Particularly
Caslon224 (book, italics, bold, and bold italics) and Helvetica
(light, light italics, black, and black italics).</parstyle>

<parstyle bulstyle=3 bulskip=.1in lskip=.3in tskip=2pt>Section
headers. They are normally in bold but don't have to
be.</parstyle>

<parstyle bulstyle=3 lskip=.3in tskip=2pt>Paragraph shapes. While
there are only 2 options directly available, there are very, very many
indirectly available.<footnote ref=AA>``Why don't the big dots
line up?'' asked Alice, who was accustomed to looking only at the
surface of things.

``Oh, I see.'' she exclaimed when she looked under the
hood.</footnote></parstyle>

<section>Footnotes,<footnote>Think of this as a
test.</footnote> <it>Footnotes</it><footnote
adjnum=1>Think of this as another test.</footnote>, and
<bi>Footnotes</bi><footnote>Think of this as the final
exam. I can think of at least three questions that could be asked
about the section header this note is from. So, the exam is: What are
the questions, and (of course) what are the
answers?</footnote></section>

The processor provides over 30 commands which may be used in essays
and other material destined for an issue of the
<it>Journal</it>. The two commands used most frequently are
probably <it>italics</it> and footnotes.<footnote
fnline>Several studies of actual essays show that on average each
page contains 4.6 footnotes and each footnote switches
<it>in</it> and <it>out</it> of italics 6.7 times
(each switch <it>in</it> and <it>out</it> counts as
2). Should those studies be believed?

``And why is there a line before the footnotes on this page. There
shouldn't be a line there.'' Poor Alice, she hadn't really caught on
that not only can words change their meaning, but they and their
friends (e.g., <line wd=.25in>) can show up almost anywhere we
(you and I) choose.</footnote>

Footnotes are particularly easy to use with the processor. It
automatically numbers each note and readjusts the numbers if a note is
added or removed.<footnote> ``If that is the case, then where did
<bf>6</bf> go?'' asked Alice.

``Oh, cute. The little dots line up here. I guess you saved
up.''</footnote> It lets you put a note almost anywhere: at the
end of the essay's title and/or the author's name; at any point in the
body of the essay; after any word in a section heading; but not in a
footnote itself;<footnote>Unless you work really\512-12\513- hard.

<tex>\indent\setbox1=\hbox to 25pt{\hfil 12.\hskip
4pt}\llap{\box1}</tex>And why would you want to do
that?</footnote> and of course tables are tables<footnote
adjnum=1> ``Yes,'' thought Alice. ``I've always thought that.''

``But why aren't you lining <ul>my</ul> words up? Did I do
something wrong?''</footnote> and so deserve a section for
themselves.

Finally,<footnote>``Excuse me. Is it too late? I think something
is missing on page 1.''

``Thank you, Alice. I was wondering when someone would ask. Lets, add
that to the final exam.''

``Ok.'' said Lets. ``Now we've got 4.''</footnote> there may be
times when a reference to a footnote is made in the body of the
article (e.g., see footnote <xref fn=AA> where complete details
are given about <it>big</it> dots). If footnotes are added or
removed such cross references may no longer be valid. In a short
(15--25) page essay the number of references will probably be small
and one could check them manually. However, the processor can take
care of those details if you want it to.

<section >Fonts: The Good Stuff\|<font
hijs=8><bf>Helvetica </bf>and <font
hijs=3><bf>Caslon
<rm>TwoTwo</rm>Four</bf></section>

Fonts have a face (e.g., Caslon224: book, italics, bold, bold italics
or Helvetica: light, light italics, black, black italics) and a
size. The bulk of the material in an essay (or in the
<it>Journal</it>) uses only a few sizes: article title,
author's name, body, long quotes, footnote, verso page headers,
Helvetica body, and book reviews. Actually, more is going on behind
the scenes. Each of the above <it>sizes</it> consists of a
body size, a superscript size, and a baseline skip value. That makes
it possible to take something like: <it>Marine du
XVIII\512-\`eme\513- si\`ecle</it> and have it come out right if
it is put in any of the standard sizes or faces.  <comment>This is
a good example of <par>. The lines ending with <par> don't
need the extra blank line.</comment> <parstyle ind=0pt
lskip=0.75in> <font hijs=1>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513-
si\`ecle<par> <font hijs=2>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513-
si\`ecle<par> <font hijs=3>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513-
si\`ecle<par> <font hijs=6>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513-
si\`ecle<par> <font hijs=5>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513-
si\`ecle

<font hijs=4>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513- si\`ecle

<font hijs=7>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513- si\`ecle

<font hijs=8>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513- si\`ecle
</parstyle>

<font hijs=3>Only the `roman' face is displayed for each size, but
each of the 4 faces listed above can be easily selected.

<parstyle ind=0pt lskip=2pc> Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513-
si\`ecle, <it>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513- si\`ecle</it>,
<bf>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513- si\`ecle</bf>, and
<bi>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513-
si\`ecle</bi></parstyle>

<noindent>Or:

<parstyle ind=0pt lskip=2pc><font hijs=8> Marine du
XVIII\512-\`eme\513- si\`ecle, <it>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513-
si\`ecle</it>, <bf>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513-
si\`ecle</bf>, and <bi>Marine du XVIII\512-\`eme\513-
si\`ecle</bi></parstyle>

<font hijs=3>So, if words in an essay title are entered correctly,
they will print correctly at the start of the title (with big
letters), in the table of contents (in italics at a different size),
and in the index (in roman with quotes).

In addition to the above standard sizes and faces, the processor
allows you to use any type 1<footnote>``That means Adobe
postscript, Alice. Also, <it>bullets</it> sounds more
professional than <it>big</it> dots.''

``Thanks, Lets. I am trying, but there is so much that is
new.''</footnote> font in any size. However, you have to know the
name of the font in order to use it.<footnote>The name is on the
<it>font table</it> sheet that should be printed and placed
with the hij documentation when a new font is installed. The 8 names
for Caslon and Helvetica are: pc2k9y, pc2ki9y, pc2b9y, pc2bi9y and
phvl9y, phvlo9y, phvbl9y, phvblo9y.''

``No, Alice. These won't be on the final, and you don't have to
memorize them. You can look them up (see Tables 1 & 2) if and when you
need them.''</footnote>

<tfont face=phvl9y ps1=9 ps2=7 bs=12>This is Helvetica light in
9/12. Clearly, the same trick used here will work anywhere in the
essay's body, a footnote,</tfont><footnote>``See, Alice.''

<tfont face=phvl9y ps1=8 ps2=5.2 bs=10.2>``Yes, I agree it does
take some work. If necessary, I can work on
it.''</tfont></footnote> <tfont face=phvl9y ps1=9 ps2=7
bs=12>or a section heading (as we may see later). However, it takes
a different approach to get size changes in the title or table of
contents. Basically, you have to set several
<it>items</it><footnote>``Yes, Alice. This was a
surprise. It's what happens with non-family fonts.''</footnote>
for the appropriate </tfont><tfont face=phvlo9y ps1=8 ps2=5.2
bs=10.2>special formatting codes.</tfont><footnote>Unless
you work harder.</footnote>

There is one last thing relating to fonts:
<ul>underlining</ul>. This is something that is
<ul>NOT</ul> recommended by some sources and would be a big
<ul pos2=0pt>pain</ul> to do for several lines. But it does
work for a <ul>word or two</ul>, if you are lucky. If you are
not, it may be a little <ul>pain</ul>, a medium <ul
pos1=2pt>pain</ul> or a big <ul pos1=4pt>pain</ul> or a
<ul pos2=-.5ex>mess</ul>.

So, any more questions on fonts?

<section numc=5>Paragraph Styles---In Full Bloom</section>

Most paragraphs in an essay begin with an indent and then run back and
forth from the left margin to the right margin (the result is not
unlike a drone who goes on and on), and, when you think about it, if
you think about it, there probably isn't a whole lot more to say on
the subject unless you've been thinking especially hard and so have
something additional to say and want to say it (and even then it
probably isn't new).<footnote>``Yes Alice, that is a run-on
sentence, and it doesn't make much sense, but for the rest of this
section don't read the words, just look at the shapes and check the
footnotes to see what is going on.</footnote>

<longquote>Most paragraphs in an essay begin with an indent and
then run back and forth from the left margin to the right margin (the
result is not unlike a drone who goes on and on), and, when you think
about it, if you think about it, there probably isn't a whole lot more
to say on the subject unless you've been thinking especially hard and
so have something additional to say and want to say it (and even then
it probably isn't new).<footnote>This is a standard long quote:
indented left and right with a little extra space before and after
it. The smaller font size and baseline skip are built
in.</footnote></longquote>

<parstyle ind=1.5pc lskip=.5in rskip=0pt tskip=2pt bskip=2pt>Most
paragraphs in an essay begin with an indent and then run back and
forth from the left margin to the right margin (the result is not
unlike a drone who goes on and on), and, when you think about it, if
you think about it, there probably isn't a whole lot more to say on
the subject unless you've been thinking especially hard and so have
something additional to say and want to say it (and even then it
probably isn't new).<footnote>This is flush
right.</footnote></parstyle>

<parstyle ind=0pt pfs=0pt lskip="20pt plus 2in" rskip="20pt plus
2in" tskip="3pt plus 1pt minus 1pt" bskip="3pt plus 1pt minus
1pt">Most paragraphs in an essay begin with an indent and then run
back and forth from the left margin to the right margin (the result is
not unlike a drone who goes on and on), and, when you think about it,
if you think about it, there probably isn't a whole lot more to say on
the subject unless you've been thinking especially hard and so have
something additional to say and want to say it (and even then it
probably isn't new).<footnote>This is centered with ragged left
and right margins.</footnote></parstyle>

<parstyle ind=0pt lskip=0pt rskip=.5in tskip="3pt plus 1pt minus
1pt" bskip="3pt plus 1pt minus 1pt">Most paragraphs in an essay
begin with an indent and then run back and forth from the left margin
to the right margin (the result is not unlike a drone who goes on and
on), and, when you think about it, if you think about it, there
probably isn't a whole lot more to say on the subject unless you've
been thinking especially hard and so have something additional to say
and want to say it (and even then it probably isn't
new).<footnote>This is flush left.</footnote></parstyle>

<parstyle ind=1pc lskip=0pt rskip=".5in plus 1in" tskip=2pt
bskip=2pt>Most paragraphs in an essay begin with an indent and then
run back and forth from the left margin to the right margin (the
result is not unlike a drone who goes on and on), and, when you think
about it, if you think about it, there probably isn't a whole lot more
to say on the subject unless you've been thinking especially hard and
so have something additional to say and want to say it (and even then
it probably isn't new).<footnote>This is flush left and ragged
right.</footnote></parstyle>

<parstyle ind=10pt lskip=6pt rskip=14pt tskip=2pt
bskip=2pt><font hijs=5>Most paragraphs in an
<it>essay</it> begin with an indent and then run back and
forth from the <bf>left</bf> margin to the
<bf>right</bf> margin (<font hijs=8>the result is not
unlike a drone who goes on and on<font hijs=5>), and, when you
think about it, if you think about it, there probably isn't a whole
lot more to say on the subject unless you've been thinking especially
hard and so have something additional to say and want to say it (and
even then it probably isn't new).<footnote>Of course, you can put
fonts and other stuff in one of the paragraph
styles.</footnote></parstyle>

<bf>So, to summarize</bf>. The processor can make a paragraph
any rectangular shape, with any left and right margins and any initial
indent. It can justify or leave ragged either margin. Also, it can use
bullet style paragraphs with the bullet at the left margin, centered,
or at a specified distance from the text. Any questions, before we
continue?<footnote>``Very good, Alice. I do realize that section
headers came before paragraph shapes in the outline, but if you look
back, I think you'll see various headers have crept in (sort of on
their own). Also, I bet that if I can make this paragraph go on long
enough, it will become too long and get split (really split) over two
pages. See.''</footnote>

<tex>\tracingpages=1{</tex> <section numc=5
bskip=12pt>Miscellaneous Items\|<vhskip
vs=4pt>Polish<footnote>``No Alice, you did not wake up in
Geography class---or any other land. This is either
<it>reverse</it> Polish <it>notation</it> or elbow
grease---take your pick.</footnote>\|<vhskip vs=6pt><it>&
the <rm>Meaning</rm> of it All</it></section>

Unfortunately, not everything in an essay takes place with A-Z and a-z
with an occasional 0--9 thrown in.<footnote>``It's coming
Alice. Do try and be patient.''

``I am, but I do so want to see an ogonek, particularly on an
A.''</footnote>

Sometimes, extra stuff is needed. Rather than take up additional time
and space with explanations let's<footnote>``No. Not you,
Lets. Sorry.''</footnote> just show things and then move on.

<vhskip vs=3pt><noindent>So: re accents, we (you and I) can
do:<vhskip vs=4pt>

<font hijs=2><noindent> \'A \u B \v C \^D \"E \.F \`H \H I \=J
\r K \~L \d M \b N \c O \o P <vhskip hs=.1in>or<vhskip
hs=.1in>\'a \u a \v a \^a \"a \.a \`a \H a \=a \r a \~a \d a \b a \c
a \o a

<noindent> \'A \u B \v C \^D \"E \.F \`H \H I \=J \r K \~L \d M \b
N \c O \o P <vhskip hs=.1in>or<vhskip hs=.1in>\'e \u e \v e
\^e \"e \.e \`e \H e \=e \r e \~e \d e \b e \c e \o e

<font hijs=8><noindent> \'A \u B \v C \^D \"E \.F \`H \H I \=J
\r K \~L \d M \b N \c O \o P <vhskip hs=.45in>or<vhskip
hs=.1in><font hijs=3>\'\i\ \u \i\ \v \i\ \^\i\ \"\i\ \.\i\ \`\i\
\H \i\ \=\i\ \r \i\ \~\i\ \d i \b i \c i \o i<footnote>``So,
Alice. What do you think?''

``Cool. Far out---Well you did ask me what I think. And I do so like
the ogonek. But the p.''

``Keep it clean, Alice! This may get put where the Public can see
it.''

``I'm sorry. But the Helvetica capital P does look a little mixed
up. And of course it looks like the <it>ss</it>---silly
spaces---is creaping back in. And I did so hope to see the ogonek on
an Caslon capital A.''

``Well, it shows what comes out of the box. If necessary you (or I)
can work harder and make it better. And who knows what tomorrow may
bring.''</footnote>

<font hijs=2><noindent><it>\'A \u B \v C \^D \"E \.F \`H
\H I \=J \r K \~L \d M \b N \c O \o P</it><vhskip hs=.15in>\'o
\u o \v o \^o \"o \.o \`o \H o \=o \r o \~o \d o \b o \c o \o
o<footnote>``As for the <it>ss</it>, how's
this?''</footnote>

<noindent><bf>\'A \u B \v C \^D \"E \.F \`H \H I \=J \r K \~L
\d M \b N \c O \o P</bf>\ \'u \u u \v u \^u \"u \.u \`u \H u \=u
\r u \~u \d u \b u \c u \o u

<font hijs=3><vhskip vs=12pt><noindent> Sometimes, other
tricks are needed.

For example f' is broken<footnote>At least it is out of the box
(or so it seems to me), and I've not taken the time to fix it
yet.</footnote>. But there are other options: f\R0', f\R1', f\R2',
f\R3', f\R4'<footnote>``Whoa, that's far enough or even too
far.''</footnote> Of course you could do: f\L0', f\L1', f\L2',
f\L3', f\L4', f\L5', f\L6', \ and while that looks silly and has an
unwanted side effect,<footnote>``The comma,
Alice.''</footnote> in some cases that is exactly what you want.

<vhskip vs=.1in> <dropcap>A\L7BSOLUTELY, exactly what you
want. Although, I hope (somewhere down the road) to make kerns
automatic in the situation at the start of this parapraph.

<parstyle ind=0pt pfs=0pt lskip="0pt plus 2in" rskip="0pt plus 2in"
bskip=0.35in><vhskip vs=-.15in> <tfont face=pc2k9y ps1=144
ps2=100 bs=144><tex>\hbox to \hsize{\hfil\o
A\hfil}</tex></tfont> <vhskip vs=4pt><bf>Ogonek on an
A<footnote>``You're welcome, Alice. See, <it>tomorrow</it>
not only is another day---it sometimes does
arrive.''</footnote></bf></parstyle>

Words seem superfluous after an <it>ogonek</it> on a Caslon224
A. So, ``Lets,<footnote>``Yes, you, Lets.''</footnote> collect
the questions, and we will deal with them next time.''

<section>Tables<footnote>These bring their own trumpets, so
they don't need much additional fanfare.</footnote></section>

<section tskip=12pt bskip=4pt>Table 1\|Font Families built into
the HIJ Processor</section><tex>\def\|{\hbox to
.15in{\hfil}}\def\A {\hbox to .35in{\hfil}}\halign{%
\it#\hfil&\quad#\hfil&\quad\hfil#\hfil&\quad#\hfil&\quad\hfil#\cr
Family Name&Usage&Base ps&Superscript ps&Baseline skip\cr
\tablerule\cr \csname ffamAname\endcsname&\csname
ffamAAname\endcsname&\csname ffamAApsA\endcsname&\A \csname
ffamAApsB\endcsname&\csname ffamAAbs\endcsname\|\cr &\csname
ffamABname\endcsname&\csname ffamABpsA\endcsname&\A \csname
ffamABpsB\endcsname&\csname ffamABbs\endcsname\|\cr &\csname
ffamACname\endcsname&\csname ffamACpsA\endcsname&\A \csname
ffamACpsB\endcsname&\csname ffamACbs\endcsname\|\cr &\csname
ffamADname\endcsname&\csname ffamADpsA\endcsname&\A \csname
ffamADpsB\endcsname&\csname ffamADbs\endcsname\|\cr &\csname
ffamAEname\endcsname&\csname ffamAEpsA\endcsname&\A \csname
ffamAEpsB\endcsname&\csname ffamAEbs\endcsname\|\cr &\csname
ffamAFname\endcsname&\csname ffamAFpsA\endcsname&\A \csname
ffamAFpsB\endcsname&\csname ffamAFbs\endcsname\|\cr &\csname
ffamAGname\endcsname&\csname ffamAGpsA\endcsname&\A \csname
ffamAGpsB\endcsname&\csname ffamAGbs\endcsname\|\cr \csname
ffamBname\endcsname&\csname ffamBAname\endcsname&\csname
ffamBApsA\endcsname&\A \csname ffamBApsB\endcsname&\csname
ffamBAbs\endcsname\|\cr }</tex> <vhskip vs=4pt>
<section>Table 2\|File Names for Major Families</section>
<tex>\figure{\halign{% \it#\hfil&&\quad#\hfil\cr Family
Name&roman&\it italics&\bf bold&\bi bold italics\cr \tablerule\cr
\csname ffamAname\endcsname&\csname ffamArm\endcsname&\csname
ffamAit\endcsname&\csname ffamAbf\endcsname&\csname
ffamAbi\endcsname\cr \csname ffamBname\endcsname&\csname
ffamBrm\endcsname&\csname ffamBit\endcsname&\csname
ffamBbf\endcsname&\csname ffamBbi\endcsname\cr
}}{}{12pt}{4pt}{}</tex>

Tables 1 and 2 are interesting for several reasons. First, they
document vital font data used by the processor.<footnote>One
beauty of the way things fit together is that the values in Tables 1
and 2 appear in only 1 place in the TeX formatting file used to
typeset <it>Journal</it> material. It is not clear if the
superscript point sizes and the Helvetica point sizes are the ones
that should be used (also the Helvetica bold file names may
change). All I need to do is change something in that one place, and
typeset material will reflect those values. In particular if this
document is reprinted, Tables 1 and 2 will be automatically
updated. So, they should be viewed as the definitive source for basic
font information.</footnote> Second, if you look closely at Table
1, you should see that the heading line entends slightly into the
right margin. I told TeX to put 1 quad (i.e., 1 em) between each
column. If I'd used a slightly smaller space or changed the wording,
the header would have fit inside the margins. Third, look at Table
2. It is centered, and text in the header and body of the table uses
different faces.<footnote>However, if you look under the hood at
the two tables, you may throw up your hands and say, ``Help! No way am
I going to figure this out.'' The difficulties in Tables 1 and 2 are
all the commands used to make the correct words and values appear in
the tables. They make it virtually impossible (for a newbie) to tell
what is required for each table and what is not. Skip them. Look at
the other tables which actually come from the
<it>Journal</it>.</footnote>

Tables require the following: A header which may extend over several
lines; the actual table with column heading, optional
rules,<footnote>``Horizontal or vertical lines,
Alice.''</footnote> and the rows of the table; possible footnotes
either in the header, the column heading or the rows; extra space
before and after the table; possible font changes inside the table;
special positioning (on the left margin, centered, something else);
the ability to float; <ellipsis> We will begin by just doing the
main part of several tables, and then put all the pieces together.

<vhskip vs=6pt><noindent>Example 1<footnote>See
<it>JMH</it> 61:4, 738. The table there is slightly
different. There is more space between the columns (which is easy),
and the last row extends beyond the rule (which I've not thought
about).</footnote>

<tex>\figure{\halign{% #\hfil&&\quad#\hfil\cr \it Unit&\it
Location&\it Comments\cr \tablerule\cr 38th Regt.&vic. Khe Sanh&308th
Divisional Artillery\cr 54th Regt.&Central DMZ&320th Divisional
Artillery\cr \ellipsis{}\cr unknown units&DMZ&122-mm gun, 152-mm
gun-how.\cr }}{}{6pt}{4pt}{}</tex>

<vhskip vs=6pt><noindent>Example 2<footnote>See
<it>JMH</it> 61:4, 753.</footnote>

<tex>\figure{\halign{% USS \it#\hfil&\quad\quad#\hfil\cr \omit\it
Ship&\it Armament\er\noalign{\smallskip} Boston \rm CAG-1&6-$8''$/55,
10-$5''$/38\cr St. Paul \rm CA-73&9-$8''$/55, 12-$5''$/38\cr
\omit\ellipsis{}\cr }}{}{6pt}{4pt}{}</tex>

<vhskip vs=6pt><noindent>Example 3<footnote>See
<it>JMH</it> 61:4, 753. This is an alternate way to do the
previous example, but you have to look under the hood to see how it is
different.</footnote>

<tex>\figure{\halign{% #\hfil&\quad\quad#\hfil\cr \it Ship&\it
Armament\er\noalign{\smallskip} USS {\it Boston } CAG-1&6-$8''$/55,
10-$5''$/38 \cr USS {\it St. Paul } CA-73&9-$8''$/55, 12-$5''$/38 \cr
\omit\ellipsis{}\cr }}{}{6pt}{4pt}{}</tex>

<vhskip vs=6pt><noindent>Example 4<footnote>See
<it>JMH</it> 61:4, 753. This is a third way to do the previous
2 examples.</footnote>

<tex>\figure{\halign{% #\hfil\hskip.5in&#\hfil\cr \it Ship&\it
Armament\er\noalign{\smallskip} USS {\it Boston } CAG-1&6-$8''$/55,
10-$5''$/38 \cr USS {\it St. Paul } CA-73&9-$8''$/55, 12-$5''$/38 \cr
\omit\ellipsis{}\cr }}{}{6pt}{4pt}{}</tex>

<vhskip vs=1in> This will be expanded. Stay tuned<ellipsis 4>

<section numc=4 tskip=5in>The Final
Exam<tex>\footnote{\superscript{6}}{6.}{}{}{``Relax, Alice. There
are only 4 questions which I assume you're already answered. So, I'm
going to give the answers and let <ul pos2=-.5ex>you</ul> each
person grade his or her own exam. Also, give yourself (Alice only) the
grade you need.''}</tex></section>

<noindent><bf>First</bf>. What are the three questions
from footnote 8?

1. Where is footnote 6? <it>Voil\`a</it>! It is here. Better
late than never. I could ask how it got here, but since that answer is
the same as the one for # 2, why bother.<footnote>``Rhetorical,
Alice.''

``I thought it was. But say, it's neat how the 4.6 came out. How'd you
do that?</footnote>

2. Why is the comma before the 5 but after the 7? See the second
paragraph of note 9 for the answer!

3. Why are each of the numbers in Roman even though the
<it>base</it> words are in <bf>bold</bf>,
<it>italics</it>, and <bi>bold italics</bi>? No, this
answer is not the same as the one for number 2. It is: that's how
footnotes work (or at least how I understand them to work). If I'm
wrong, it will change! However, compare footnotes with <it>Marine
du XVIII\512-\`eme\513- si\`ecle</it> and its friends shown
earlier.

<noindent><bf>Second</bf>. What is missing on page 1?
`<tex>\char152</tex> Society for Military History'

When I was doing my homework, I saw one essay (61:3, 583) without
it. So, I put in an option to leave it out.

<noindent><bf>Extra Credit</bf>. The previous paragraph
should have been placed in a footnote. Why wasn't it? Hint: Check
footnote 9.

</article>

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