Mad Prophet's Sanctuary

War on Drugs

The table of contents of Peter McWilliams book Ain't Nobody's Business if You Do explains the "war on drugs" far better than I can:

Why Laws Against Consensual Activites are not a Good Idea

It's UnAmerican

Laws against Consensual Activities Are Unconstitutional

Laws against Consensual Activities Violate the Separation of Church and State, Threatening the Freedom of and from Religion

Laws against Consensual Activities Are Opposed to the Principles of Private Property, Free Enterprise, Capitalism, and the Open Market

Enforcing Laws against Consensual Activities is Very Expensive

Enforcing Laws against Consensual Activities Destroys People's Lives

Consensual Crimes Encourage Real Crimes

Consensual Crimes Corrupt Law Enforcement

The Cops Can't Catch 'Em; the Courts Can't Handle 'Em; the Prisons Can't Hold 'Em

Consensual Crimes Promote Organized Crime

Consensual Crimes Corrupt the Freedom of the Press

Laws against Consensual Activities Teach Irresponsibility

Laws against Consensual Activities Are Too Randomly Enforced to Be Either a Deterrent or Fair

Laws against Consensual Activities Discriminate against the Poor, Minorities, and Women

Problems Sometimes Associated with Consensual Activities Cannot Be Solved While They Are Crimes

Laws against Consensual Activities Create a Society of Fear, Hatred, Bigotry, Oppression, and Conformity; a Culture Opposed to Personal Expression, Diversity, Freedom, Choice and Growth

Regardless of your political views, there's a reason to oppose this war on people. Peter McWilliams died in 2000 as yet another casualty in the "war on drugs" as a result of federal judge George King denying him his legally proscribed medicinal marijuana to treat nausea that resulted from chemotherapy.

Articles

Break This Vile Addiction
Donald Boudreaux, chairman of the economics department at George Mason University and former President of FEE, explains a dangerous addiction that jeopardizes our society.