Red Ball PANNEBAKKER-PFANNEBECKER SHIELD

The Pannebakker - Pfannebecker family shield is embraced by descendants of Henry PANNEBECKER and Weiant (I) PANNEBECKER / PENNEBAKER.

 
Shield Old Shield New

Traditional Family Shield 1 with a German motto of "Mein Siegel ist ein Ziegel - My Seal is a Tile." The shield is described as: "A tile erect which rests in the ground and is surrounded by leaves." 2 Described by Henry PENNYPACKER 3 as: "Usually 3 tiles shown. (Looks like an erect spade with a short handle.)  Another argent 3 scrolls 2 and 1 gules; crest : a winged scroll." 4

Color rendition of the Family Shield used by the MICHEL-PFANNEBECKER Winery of Flomborn, Germany and is essentially the same as the traditional shield.

 
An earlier color rendition.
 
References:

1.  Traditional Shield from Hendrick Pannebecker, Surveyor Of Lands For The Penns, 1674-1754, Flomborn, Germantown and Skippack by Honorable Samuel W. Pennypacker, LL.D., privately printed, Philadelphia, 1894.
2.  Charles Knowles Bolton, "Bolton's American Armory", Heraldic Book Company, Baltimore, MD, 1964, page 129.
3.  A descendant of Hendrick PANNEBECKER.
4.  Heraldry terms:
      º Argent is the metal silver, represented by the color white.
      º Blazon is a coat of arms.
      º Gules is the color red, indicated on a blazon by engraved vertical stripes.

 


Green Ball  ABOUT THAT FAMILY SHIELD

The PANNEBAKKER/PFANNEBECKER/PENNEBAKER shield has inferred authenticity - within the heraldry practices in the U. S. - since it has been used by family members in the U.S. for many generations, PANNEBAKKER households in the Netherlands currently display these arms, Gov. Samuel W. Pennypacker shows the same arms in his book about his ancestor, Henry Pannebecker, and Weingut Michel-Pfannebecker in Flomborn, Germany uses the arms as their logo.

On the 15th of September 1463, an edict was issued in the Netherlands forbidding further use of thatch or straw as roofing material. A family ancestor proposed the use of clay tile as the roofing material. He submitted some tile blocks to the authorities and they were accepted as the new roofing material and thereafter houses should be roofed with tiles. The benefit to tile-makers is obvious. The ancestor, perhaps named BIERMAN as thought by some, was knighted and given the name PANNEBAKKER. The use of roofing tile in the Netherlands is very prominent to this day. The family shield probably had its origin about the time of the roofing tile requirement is described as "A tile erect which rests in the ground and is surrounded by leaves" and "looking like an erect spade with short handle", reflects their tile maker occupation. Further described as "an argent, 3 scrolls, 2 and 1 gules; crest: a winged scroll." The PANNEBAKKER coat-of-arms was taken to Deutschland with the migration of family members, adopted and used by the Germanic PFANNEBECKER family and given the motto: "Mein Siegel ist ein Ziegel - My Seal is a Tile."


Green Ball  ABOUT COAT OARMS

Actually, very few American families are entitled to bear arms. A coat of arms belongs only to the person to whom it was granted and, like any other piece of property, to his direct descendants. Other persons of the same surname, no mater how closely or how distantly related, have no right to it unless they descend from the original owner. Consequently, the right to bear arms in the country is limited to those comparatively few families who can show direct descent from an arms bearing ancestor.

The armorial insignia identified a person in the past in the same manner as a surname does today, only more so, since there are many families with the same surname, but an identical coat of arms was used only by those of the same descent.

Devices on a shield were selected by the first bearer of the shield for any reason that seemed good to him, (provided no one else was using a similar combination), or for no reason at all - just as you choose baptismal names for your children.

A knowledge of the component parts of armorial bearings is very necessary to one's understanding of the emblems. Often we speak of a "crest" when we mean an "achievement." The coat of arms itself is the "shield" or "escutcheon." It represents an ancient piece of defensive armor on the face of which, known as the field, are emblazoned the charges or bearings in definite fixed colors. Together they constitute a coat of arms. This is the most essential of all the armorial insignia.

When the shield and crest are grouped and displayed, including the helmet, the wreath, the mantling, and, in the case of a peer, the supporters, if any, all this is known as an "achievement" and not a crest.

There is a prevailing idea that everybody has a coat of arms and that it is only a question of finding it. A more fallacious idea could hardly exist. Another mistaken idea is that anybody can assume a crest in the same haphazard manner in which one designs a monogram. The crest represents the molded, wrought or carved figure fixed to the knight's helmet.

The delusion that crests are hereditary and may be assumed at will is very deep-rooted. There are many coats of arms in existence to which no crests have ever been assigned, but there is not a solitary crest lawfully existing without its complementary coat of arms. Unless there be an undoubted right to arms is it absolutely certain there can be no right to a crest. A crest is essentially but a part of a formal armorial achievement and cannot exist alone.

It is not to be supposed, that because your ancestor did not posses arms, it is any indication of inferiority of family. Some of the finest old families of English nobility did not posses arms, so their American descendants, of course, inherited none. Arms are not a necessity; consequently, since no one is compelled to use them there is not one single solitary position in life which demands the personal use of a coat of arms.

A man can be born, can live and can die perfectly happy and contented without a coat of arms, good or bad. Millions have done it in the past, and millions will do it in the future.

There have been a great many people who insisted upon having a coat of arms, whether they had a right to them or not, and there were also a number of pretenders calling themselves heraldic artists, who were willing to supply anything for a price. A coat of arms does not necessarily belong to a person just because someone of the same surname bore it. He must prove descent from the owner.

The use of coat armor in the United States is a matter of personal taste. There is no American law by which you can obtain a coat of arms, as our government has not ever recognized coat armor. In using coats of arms, we should abide by the laws governing its use in the country in which the arms were granted. The right to bear arms in this country is limited to those comparatively few families who can show a direct descent from an arms bearing ancestor.

 


References:

1.  Traditional Shield from Hendrick Pannebecker, Surveyor Of Lands For The Penns, 1674-1754, Flomborn, Germantown and Skippack by Honorable Samuel W. Pennypacker, LL.D., privately printed, Philadelphia, 1894.
2.  Charles Knowles Bolton, "Bolton's American Armory", Heraldic Book Company, Baltimore, MD, 1964, page 129.
3.  A descendant of Hendrick PANNEBECKER.
4.  Heraldry terms:
      º Argent is the metal silver, represented by the color white.
      º Blazon is a coat of arms.
      º Gules is the color red, indicated on a blazon by engraved vertical stripes.


Top Prepared by  Paul E. Pennebaker