Wages in the 1790 Census

John Wages of Richland County, SC with his five children


WAGES/WAGERS

1790 United States Federal Census


Wages DNA Group # State County Page Head of Household Free White Males 16 Yrs and Older Free White Males Under 16 Yrs Free White Females Other Free Persons Slaves Total
Maryland Charles 55 Mary Wages 0 0 1 0 0 1
North Carolina Sampson 54 Submit Wages 0 0 2 0 0 2
w00002 South Carolina Edgefield 65 Ben Wages 1 1 2 0 0 4
South Carolina Orangeburgh 97 James Wages 1 2 5 0 0 8
Maryland Anne Arundel 13 James Wagers 1 1 1 0 7 10
Maryland Baltimore 25 Luke Wagers 2 2 2 0 0 6
Maryland Baltimore 26 William Wagers 3 1 3 0 0 7
North Carolina Anson 37 Drury Wagers 1 2 3 0 0 6
w00001 North Carolina Sampson 52 Dawson Wagers 1 3 2 0 0 6
w00002 South Carolina Edgefield 65 Ben Wagers, Sr. 1 2 3 0 0 6
South Carolina Edgefield 65 Lucy Wagers 0 1 4 0 0 5
New Hampshire Hillsborough 48 Hannah Wager 0 0 4 0 0 4
New York Albany 33 Leonard Wager 2 4 5 0 0 11
New York Albany 37 Nicholas Wager 4 2 2 0 0 8
New York Albany 37 Thomas Wager 3 4 3 0 0 10
New York Columbia 61 Barent Wager 3 0 3 0 2 8
New York Columbia 61 Jacob Wager 1 0 2 0 1 4
New York Columbia 66 John Wager 1 1 2 0 0 4
New York Columbia 70 John Wager 1 0 1 0 0 2
New York Montgomery 116 Henry Wager 1 0 1 0 0 2
Pennsylvania Philadelphia 207 George Wager 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pennsylvania Philadelphia 215 Philip Wager 4 2 9 0 0 15



  The United States was the first country to call for a regularly held census. The Constitution required that a census of all "Persons...excluding Indians not taxed" be performed to determine the collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives. The first nine censuses from 1790-1870 were organized under the United States Federal Court system. Each district was assigned a U.S. marshal who hired other marshals to administer the census. Governors were responsible for enumeration in territories. The jurisdiction of the original thirteen states canvassed an area of seventeen present states. Schedules survive for eleven of the thirteen original states: Connecticut, Maine (part of Massachusetts at the time), Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and Vermont. (Vermont became the fourteenth state early in 1791 and was included in the census schedules). Enumerators were only required to make one copy of the census schedules to be held by the clerk of the district court in their respective area. In 1830, Congress passed a law requiring the return of all decennial censuses from 1790-1830. At this point it was discovered that many of the 1790 schedules had been lost or destroyed. Thus, we have about two-thirds of the original census from the time period. The 1790 census suffered district losses of Delaware, Georgia, Kentucky, New Jersey, and Virginia. However, some of the schedules for these states have been re-created using tax lists and other records. Virginia was eventually reconstructed from tax lists as well as some counties from North Carolina and Maryland.

Taken from Chapter 5: Research in Census Records, The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy by Loretto Dennis Szucs; edited by Loretto Dennis Szucs and Sandra Hargreaves Luebking (Salt Lake City, UT: Ancestry Incorporated, 1997).

                                                   

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